MASTERING CHEMISTRY HOMEWORK ANSWERS CHAPTER 13

And this is the idea of rolling a die. Video transcript What I want to do in this video is give you at least a basic overview of probability. And they’re all equally likely. So there’s two possibilities here, two equally likely possibilities. To log in and use all the features of Khan Academy, please enable JavaScript in your browser. So the number of possibilities that meet my constraint, that meet my conditions.

And you can run that simulation. I encourage you to do it. And of course, you have, you know, the different sides of the die. So that is heads. So there’s two possibilities here, two equally likely possibilities. And so when I talk about a fair coin, I mean that it has an equal chance of landing on one side or another.

Well, only one of them meets my condition, that right there.

I’ll assume it’s a quarter of some kind. Now, another way to think about or conceptualize probability that will give you this exact same answer is to say, well, if I were to run the experiment of chemietry a coin– so this flip, you view this as an experiment. What is the probability of rolling a 2 and a 3?

mastering chemistry homework answers chapter 13

You know, you normally think an experiment is doing something in chemistry or physics or all the rest. So in the case of the probability of figuring out heads, what is the number of equally likely possibilities?

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If you take or quarters or pennies, stick them in a big box, shake the box so you’re kind of simultaneously flipping all of the coins, and then count how many of those are going to be heads.

mastering chemistry homework answers chapter 13

Getting a 2 and a 3 are mutually exclusive events. The other side right over there is tails. And you can run that simulation.

And the other side, of course, is the tails. And so if I were to ask you, what is the probability– I’m going to flip a coin.

Well, what are the number of equally likely possibilities? Well, once again, there are six equally likely possibilities for what I can get. And we’ll talk about different ways of describing that. Random number list to run experiment.

Theoretical probability | Statistics and Probability (video) | Khan Academy

So that’s the 1. So if I were to ask you, what is the probability given that I’m rolling a fair die– so the experiment is rolling this fair die, what is the probability of getting a 1? And while we’re starting with probability, at least kind of the basic, this is probably an easier thing to conceptualize.

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You could either get heads, or you could get tails. And they’re all equally likely. We’re assuming that it lands flat. Statistical significance of experiment. Now, let’s do another very typical example when you first learn probability. Interpreting results of simulations. They cannot happen at the same time.

Intro to theoretical probability

And this is the idea of rolling a die. And I could write that like this– the probability of getting heads. To log in and use all the features of Khan Academy, please enable JavaScript in your browser. So how many equally likely possibilities. I’m not talking about taking two rolls of this die. If I flip it in the air, it’s not more likely to land on one side or the other.

Experimental versus theoretical probability simulation. None of these are 2 and a 3. And what’s the number of possibilities that meet my conditions?

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